Manchester is a great location with lots of interesting academic visitors and expertise in my field. By surrounding myself with these successful people I've learnt a lot, not only mathematically but also on how to become a strong and independent researcher.

 

How did you decide on your degree choice? What appealed about Manchester?

During my undergraduate degree I always enjoyed learning about the differences between theoretical algorithms and practical implementation. I also had a strong interest in programming so numerical analysis was the ideal place for me to combine the two. Manchester, in particular, has a strong reputation for excellence in numerical linear algebra, which is the subject of my PhD.

What were your first impressions of the University and the city?

Manchester is an enormous city with lots going on. There’s so many different gig venues, shopping centres and sports available that everybody can find something they’re interested in. I’d definitely suggest exploring Curry Mile for some great food too!

What are you most enjoying about your course?

The things I like most about my course so far are the travel opportunities and meeting other researchers. This summer I’ll be attending events in San Diego and Shanghai, with the chance to meet all the world experts in my field. It’s very interesting to see what other people are working on and discuss new ideas together.

What skills and attributes do you think you have gained from your course and co-curricular activities so far?

The main skills that I’ve developed here have been public speaking and scientific writing. I’m now quite happy to talk about my research in front of an audience and my writing style is becoming more technical and concise. These are obviously great assets for future employment. 

I’m also president of the Manchester SIAM Student Chapter which means I organise a conference or two each year. I’ve learnt a lot about event management and funding proposals from this position.

How do you think you are benefitting from studying at Manchester?

Manchester is a great location with lots of interesting academic visitors and expertise in my field. By surrounding myself with these successful people I’ve learnt a lot, not only mathematically but also on how to become a strong and independent researcher.

What advice would you give to students considering applying for the same course that you took?

I would suggest looking carefully at what your supervisor works on: read some of their recent papers and get a sense of their current focus. After all, you’ll be doing something similar for the next three or more years. 

Also be sure to ask questions about how you’ll be funded and which conferences you’ll be likely to attend: going to conferences is a great way to see places that you wouldn’t normally so it’d be a shame to miss out.

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